Carolyn. BSN, RN. 23. Southern.
Pediatric Cardiovascular ICU.
Formerly peds ortho/surgical/urology and peds ED.

Sometimes believer in magic.
Let's be friends!

Que Sera, Sera
Sine qua non

mrslewismotheroffour:

Our son, Oliver was born on the 21st of July. A month beforehand we were told (after having multiple ultrasounds and finally an echo to diagnose the problem) that Oliver has pulmonary atresia. I was devastated when I heard the news. I cried for hours. My grandmother held me close and we both sobbed and sobbed for a good while in front of the hospital doors in her truck. I had a dentist appointment right after and I wasn’t all there. Tears kept running down my face as he drilled at my teeth. I didn’t know the full seriousness of it at the time but knowing there was something wrong with his heart tore me apart in itself.
We were told we had to go 6 1/2 hours away to Minneapolis. We live in Bismarck, North Dakota. We went there first for an appointment to see how Oliver was doing and went back home. Then we left weeks later for my due date. Going there was the only way he had a chance to survive.
We got there on a Friday and had to get hotel rooms until Monday at 3:30am when I went into labor. I have another child but I’ve never went into labor before. I had a terrible cough which didn’t help at all. It was the most painful thing I’ve experienced. After 12 hours of being in labor they finally got me in for a csection. I have a hip replacement so I had no choice. I was very calm through it all. The moment I saw his face I fell in love. Over a week later he had his surgery. They put a shunt in his heart. It broke my heart seeing him leave the room and not knowing if his little hand would ever hold my finger again. 4 hours later he came back. Everything went perfectly. He healed like a champion and we finally just came home. It was horrible being in the hospital but he’s doing so great now. :) it feels good to be home! There’s more to it but I have to shower before giving him his medication.


lisaaadoherty:

cardiacattack:

I know I’ve been a peds nurse for almost 2 years, but baby pulses can still be hella hard to find. Esp in these cardiac babies who have shit perfusion. I feel like the pulse whisper when I find one.

Hey I’m doing my peds rotation right now and it’s only a five week course and I’m terrified that I am not gonna learn anything in such a short course, any advice from a pro??

My peds course wasn’t that long in school either, sadly. I remember a professor actually refusing to teach us what a buretrol was used for because “that’s only a peds thing, none of you are probably gonna do that.” Many of the diagnoses I have taken care of I wasn’t taught about in school (that goes for all areas I’ve worked in, not just cardiac). Research things you find interesting online! Do you want to do peds yourself? To land that first peds job, focus mostly on growth and development. Once you get it, they’ll train you on the diagnoses you see most commonly in your area. They know most nursing schools don’t have a huge focus on peds, so you’re not alone.


I know I’ve been a peds nurse for almost 2 years, but baby pulses can still be hella hard to find. Esp in these cardiac babies who have shit perfusion. I feel like the pulse whisper when I find one.



Anonymous said: Hey beautiful girl, Good morning! I hope your day would still be wonderful, keep safe and let's start the week with a smile!

Who are you anon, who always sends me nice messages?!

pre-med-timelord:

sizvideos:

Video

Amazing


"I have hidden in the med room to avoid my patient’s family members."

-(via confessionsofanicurn)

spiderwomannn:

iraffiruse:

Frozach Submitted

rockinrambo


(Source: hannah90)


allheartcare:

Coronary Artery Angioplasty (PCI, Heart Stent Surgery)

This 3D heart animation shows a coronary artery angioplasty surgery, also called a percutaneous coronary intervention, or PCI, to correct a blocked artery in the heart. It begins by showing the buildup of plaque in an artery wall of the heart, blocking the flow of blood. Afterwards, the patient lies on a testing table while contrast dye is injected into the arteries of the heart, showing the location of the blockage. A guide wire is then moved through the lumen of the blood vessel, followed by a balloon and stent mechanism. The balloon inflates, putting the metal stent in place, so that the lumen of the artery is open and the red blood cells can flow freely.

For information on Atherosclerosis, visit http://www.nucleusinc.com/atheroscler…


fishandfly90:

Muscular lining and simple columnar epithelial cells, parietal cells (HCl) and chief cells (pepsinogen I, ii, and lipase). #stomach #histology #histonerd

fishandfly90:

Muscular lining and simple columnar epithelial cells, parietal cells (HCl) and chief cells (pepsinogen I, ii, and lipase). #stomach #histology #histonerd


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